click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130504
20130512
STATION
CSPAN 11
CSPAN2 5
CNBC 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
FBC 3
KQED (PBS) 3
LINKTV 2
MSNBCW 2
CNNW 1
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
weekend and we will see you on sunday. >> harris: fox urgent. there were reported lay dozen different versions of the obama administration's talking points about the attack on you are u.s. outpost in benghazi. i'm harris faulkner in tonight for shepard smith. government emails now reveal the state department made major changes to those talking points. this is according to abc news. changes were made before ambassador susan rice, who you see here, use them in her interviews on five different sunday talk shows less than a week after the terror attacks here. is one example of how the memo changed in a matter of hours. remember, this would be telling the public about what happened that night. these are the before and after versions according to abc news. emails reportedly show the state department objected to naming a specific al qaeda affiliate. and mentioning previous cia warnings about extremists in benghazi. in the end, officials dropped both references from the final version. the state department spokeswoman also added, quote, these don't resolve all of my issues or those of my build
in their chimneys. he associates them with harry potter, and he draws them in his spare time. >> i like the diversity here. every chimney is different. every door is colorful. and then there is a tolerance -- people smile at you on the street, and they are always apologizing even if you bump into them. >> he is one of thousands of poles who have come to make a living from repairing colorful but damp british houses. he used to work as a painter, but the pay is better in london. >> working here is great. the english are not as demanding as the poles or the germans where everything has to be perfect. >> his english boss is happy, too. polish labor is cheaper, and he says polh labors are more precise, more sorrow, more reliable. >> they have a better work ethic, i think, in my view, in my experience. >> nevertheless, many poles working here have noticed a change in mood since the british economy has begun to slide. >> in the beginning, we were welcomed with open arms, but that has changed now. especially when more poles can than they had expected. it was not just a few thousand, but half a
getting crushed again. harry reid ripping the junior senator from texas for being a bully. especially when it comes to the latest budget battle. does this pile-on mean democrats are fearful of this guy? >> what i love is that senator reid is finally admitting something that we've known, all america has known the senate acts like children. so at least they're finally admitting that. all that senator cruz wants to does abide by the rules, and that's something the senate doesn't know about because since 2007, it's done whatever harry reid wants to it be. so no wonder they're confused about the rules, which is what ted cruz wants to happen. >> neil: when i heard disparaging treatment of the other party i felt like saying, pot meet kettle, but that's another case. what do you think of the group phenomenon? one of the things that came through is he is dealing with this broadsides and attacks but is not shrinking from them. >> of course not. senator cruz should not. he is an attorney who knows what he is talking about and the rules are not being followed, and in this case there should be a commit
us next, who just had a meeting with jack lew. >>> prince harry's u.s. tour takes a more somber term. today he is expected to lay a wreath at the tomb of the unknowns in arlington national cemetery later this hour. we'll bring that to you live when that happens. politics planner for the day. told you a lot about it. the big stuff. political junkies. rand paul begins the 2016 campaign. you're watching "the daily rundown." we'll be right back. switch your car insurance to geico and we could help you save on boat and motorcycle insurance too. other insurance companies are green with envy. oh, no, no, no...i'm sorry, but this is all wrong? i would never say that. writer: well what would you say? gecko: well i'd probably emphasize the savings. ya know...lose that green with envy bit. rubbish. it's just a reference about my complexion. writer: but the focus groups thought that the... gecko: focus groups. geico doesn't use focus groups. uhh...excuse me. no one told me we were using focus groups. vo: geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. actually it
, gary b, thanks. more money to avoid a health care law train wreck. that's what top democrat harry reid is calling form should he get it? eric and the "cashin' in" crew on it at 11:30. but up next, may day protesters turning violent. and turning their anger towards capitalism. but should they be pointing their finger at themselves >>> sleepless in seattle. may day protests turning into anti-capitalism vie license in the emerald city as some businesses come under attack. someone here says capitalism isn't the problem. it's these guys refusing to get off their butts and do something. is that the problem, gary b? >> absolutely, brenda. if you zoomed in on that video, i bet half that group, they're wearing north face jackets, carrying iphones and are against capitalism. they need to get a job if they don't already have one. and second, if they hate capitalism so much, move to a nice socialist country like spain where the unemployment rate is 27%. let's see how long they last there. >> susan, what's your take on this? >> most of these demonstrations are really about workers' rights. they're
ordered those changes. we will look at the political fallout of all this next. plus, prince harry continuing his visit in our nation's capitol paying his respects to the fallen heroes at arlington national cemetery. more on the royal trip coming up. ♪ [playing of taps ] jon: right now new reporting reveals there where are 12 difference versions of the official administration talking points on the benghazi terror attacks, revisions. the report from abc newsletters says the state department played a big role in the changes that were made, including dropped references to terrorism. of course it was a terror attack last september 11th that took the lives of four americans, including our ambassador. paul gentleman go is editorial page editor at the "wall street journal." so, victoria newland at the state department obviously had a significant role in changing the original talking points, shortening them and saying essentially, why do we want to give ammunition to congress in referring to terrorism here? >> that's very clear from the emails that that is the case. and i think this is i
american workers mt. private sector the exact same rights that federal government workers have. mr. harris: and that is that if you're going to choose to work extra, you get a choice whether to take overtime pay or to get time off to go to your child's school. you know, in my district we have patriot days. during the school day, elementary schools, where parents would love to have the time to go and spend the day with their child this bill will give the parent the choice. not the a federal law this will give the parent the choice to take that time off as comp time instead of getting overtime. it just gives everyone more choice. mr. speaker, i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition? ms. jackson lee: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. jackson lee: mr. speaker, it gives me a sad opportunity to rise to acknowledge the loss of one of houston's distinguished citizens, not only hou
-americans like mr. buck and harris county jurors were twice as like to impose death sentences on african-americans like mr. buck. there's a long, long history of racial discrimination in the administration of the death penalty in texas and that literally goes back to the beginning of the death penalty in texas. in fact there's never been a time in texas where there hasn't been a problem in terms of the way it's been administered. there's victim disparity, race of victim disparity, unbroken record in texas in terms of acproblem of racial disparity and disproportionality. the administration of the death penalty. texas has nothing to be proud of. today right we have the attorney general and the da's office pursuing mr. buck's execution despite the fact that now a u.s. senator now texas attorney general john cornyn promised that in the face of this kind of racial discrimination mr. buck would get a new fair sentencing. they've gone back on that promise and actively seeing mr. buck executed. >> this is part of the story in many cases in mississippi too, the evidence we're alluding to in the i
should remember what does not change. 68 years ago, following the death of franklin roosevelt, harry truman became president. he was thought to be a petty politician, not very smart, and likely to fail. he had been vice president for less than two months and done little to prepare for its new for job. and yet he is remembered now was one of our most effective presidents, so effective that a prestigious national security project there is his name. the reason is that harry truman understood and reflected what is best about america. he was optimistic about the prospects for human progress, but conscious of the perils posed by weakness and fear. for allies and friends. it was exempt from the rules that apply to others. america was the champion of weberty, law, and justice for admired president truman because he dared to build greatly and because what he built was made to last. to honor his legacy, we must strive to do the same. to that end, i pledge my own best efforts. thank you very much. that. [applause] >> ok, we are ready for questions as long as you identify yourself. >> [inaudible
administration. after all, harry truman was franklin roosevelt's last vice president. most historians of the new deal stop typically in 1938 or 39. 38 was the year of the last major new deal piece of domestic legislation passed. the fair labor standards act that gave us the minimum wage and a 40 hour week. 1939 of course was the year the second world war began in europe, and some historians of course go as far as 1945, tearing through the age of roosevelt himself. the great historian david kennedy does that in his book, freedom from fear. but i thought to continue through to the truman administration, not just because harry truman had been part of the roosevelt era, but because by continuing up until 1952, 53, we can see some features of modern reality that might have remained somewhat obscure it to in particular. the first concerns the layering of fear in american life. now, fear is generated by circumstances that go beyond those of ordinary risk. life is full of risk. we buy a home, we hope it goes up in value. until recently we always thought it went up in value. we married. half of marriages
a health care law train wreck. that's what top democrat harry reid is calling form should he get it? eric and the "cashin' in" crew on it at 11:30. but up next, may day protesters turning violent. and turning their anger towards capitalism. but should they be pointing their finger at themselves we went out and asked people a simple question: how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed: the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ if you have high cholesterol, here's some information that may be worth looking into. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. getting to goal is important, especially if you have high cholesterol plus any of these risk factors because you could be at increased risk for plaque buildup in your arter
tight sunk -- tight security in the hungarian capital of budapest. harry smith has this report. the hotelecurity at where delegates from 100 countries are tethering. it is normally held in jerusalem. organizers told the -- chose the hungarian capital to raise concerns about anti-semitic movements in europe. they do not have to look far for the evidence. this was the scene a few streets away, where there was a rally to protest the decision of budapest authorities to host the congress. one jewish delegate from north america said she hoped that the presence in hungary would send a message to the world. to tell theike prime minister that hungary will not allow the rise of anti- semitism again. hungary was destroyed once. it should not be destroyed again. the third largest party in hungarian parliament initially banned the rally, but that was overturned by a budapest court. hungary has the longest -- the largest jewish community in southern europe. a keynote speaker includes the german foreign minister. >> pope francis has said prayers for children affected by violence and abuse. he
-up look at prince harry who is paying a special visit to the u.s. this week. right now time for "your money." >>> a recovery? yes. is it enough for the millions of americans still reeling from the recession? i'm christine romance, welcome to "your money." 165,000 jobs added in april. 173,000 jobs a month on average over the last year. that's enough to bring the unemployment rate down to 7.5% in april. that's the lowest it's been since december 2008. most months we see the unemployment rate fall because people are falling out of the labor force. that's not the case in april for the first time in a long time. the unemployment rate fell because people went back to work. >> monthly revisions reveal more than 150,000 more jobs were added in the beginning of the year since we thought. the unemployment rate was 4.5% before this recession. we still have a lot of work to do. one big problem, many of the jobs coming back are low-wage jobs. largest gains in april were service jobs, retail trade, health care, leisure and hospitality. every job in america is important, but some of these jobs aren'
years ago following the death of franklin roosevelt, harry truman became president. he was thought by most to be a petty politician, not very smart and likely to fail. he had been vice president for less than two months and done little to prepare for his new job. and yet he is remembered now as one of our most effective presidents, so effective that a prestigious national security project bears his name. the reason is that harry truman both understood and reflected what is best about america. he was optimistic about the prospects for human progress but conscious of the perils posed by weakness and fear. he was proud of america's strength but aware of the need for allies and friends. he thought of the united states as exceptional but not because it was exempt from the rules that apply to others. to him, america was the champion of liberty, law and justice for all. we admire president truman because he dared to build greatly, and because what he built was made to last. to honor his legacy, we -- and that includes all of us -- must strive to do the same. so to that end, i pledge my ow
:30 eastern on c-span 2. c-span three at 9:40 a.m. britain's prince harry is at the tomb of the unknown at arlington national cemetery. and the guantanamo bay prison. what options are available to the administration for transferring detainees and closing the prison. that's at 10:00 a.m. eastern then at 1:30 p.m., the institute for korean-american studies talk about how things are on the european peninsula. >> post 9/11 a whole lot more people cared about national security issues than was the case before. so all of a sudden there was a market for former c.i.a. folks and former defense intelligence agencies and national security agencies. all those guys who were used to operating in the shadows saw a market for their services as commentators and book writers. so there was this somewhat uncomfortable, you know, kind of interaction among the agencies and former employees. >> and at the time i felt water boarding was something we needed to do. as time has passed and september 11 as moved farther and farther back into history, i think i've changed my mind and i think water boarding is probabl
. guatemalan harris whitbeck was one of montt's top advisors in the ixil region. he testified for the defense at the trial. >> do they know who shot the bullet? do they know exactly on the date these people were killed? i'm not a scientist. i don't know. >> reporter: in fact, the forensic anthropologists are not that precise. but the bones aren't all that are doing the talking. 30 years ago, an eye in the sky was watching-- a u.s. science satellite called landsat passing overhead. russ schimmer is an expert in geomatics-- the science of gathering, analyzing and interpreting geographic information. he has pored over landsat images of the ixil highlands of guatemala captured before and after montt's rule. he has documented huge swaths of land that were highly vegetated in 1979 and then barren in 1986. schimmer ruled out natural causes, leaving only massive, deliberately set fires as the possible cause. >> there's no way you're going to go out there and light a match and you're going to see some of the areas that were burned are five football fields large and it covers areas which are just huge,
. it happens to be the truth. >> rose: and there's some benefit of being true. and history changed. harry truman when he left office. >> exactly. >> rose: there's also this. your family and your friends want you to speak out more and defend yourself when either the president lays a problem at your feet or someone else. >> yeah, tell them not to holdt. >> rose: you have no incentive to say, "let me tl you what." >> no, i have no desire to spend my post-presidency trying to enhance my standing. >> rose: but, i mean, you don't seem lieb the kind of guy who wants to turn the other cheek. >> well, i turned it. it's-- i'm-- i want to be productive. i want to make a difference in the world. and i want to do so without undermining our current president and/or engaging in political debate. if i was out trying to defend myself i would be right back in the swamp and i don't want to be in the swamp. >> rose: you have an institute here. >> true. >> rose: the bush institute. >> true. >> rose: and you want to look at problems and understand problems. >> that's a very interesting point you made. the bush
particularly with harry potter, you know there's some backflow to disney world. i think it's created a virtuous circle down in orlando. >> reporter: he actually calls two of them frenemies. of course they see are much large erbil companies than just parks, he says on the parks side invests and the facelift will get a good return on investment. which, of course, will help universal studios. >> it will, janie. thank you so much. >>> we're also watching the white house at this hour, the president meeting with south korea's leader to celebrated 60 anniversary of the alliance. they just started that news conference, but recent threats from nuclear-armed north korea also dominating those discussions. they're holding a joint news conference right now. we're monitoring it and will bring you any headlines that cross. >>> speaking of getaway, sailing the high seas remains a popular vacation option, as evidenced by norwegian cruise lines better than expected first quarter profits. shares of the third largest cruise operator are up 70%. they're trading at about $32 a share. simon hobbs is back with us from
with more. jamie cox, harris financial managing part another. he will tell us the biggest driver in the market right now. joe kusik is in the pits of the cme. joe, i want to start with you. we look for trends. we saw individual stocks hit record highs. any trends stand out in your mind? >> no, not right now after the move we had on friday. today we just chopped around. we're looking at price action to find the support and resistance levels. that is what the action told us today. we're just chopping around at these levels on s&p's, right around the 1610 level. i'll tell you this much. just everyone is long in here right now. so it is a very interesting time. lori: strong for the bulls. give me a sense though, joe, what some of the triggers could be in terms of whether we see a strong upside or strong downside? in other words, where do we go next? >> you know what? what is really interesting is watching activity in the bonds. that move last week down two points on the long end of the bond. there is lot of money out there. they will start to flow somewhere. we'll look at equity mark
hitters. >> jjc, but not harry s. truman who would have been better. >> signers include a memo for the move and 52 conservatives demanded house republican leaders not bring a senate bill and the keeper of the no-tax pledge and he is a fighter for small business, except for when it's small business. we'll talk more about the bill's channes in the house later today, too. >> when we come back after a rough few months and apple mounting a comeback as you may know up almost 20% and the meantime, google trading near all-time highs. which one, though? which one do you choose? we'll tell you how to play it,u akeover. today and he will join us live after that mng talked about. take one more look at futures potentially the 17th straight tuesday up in a row when we come back. change makes people nervous. but i see a world bursting with opportunity, with ideas, with ambition. i'm thinking about china, brazil, india. the world's a big place. i want to be a part of it. ishares international etfs. emerging markets and single countries. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors
've heard from a lot of investors lately. >>> in news outside the world of business today, prince harry will be arriving in washington to kick off his seven-day tour to the united states. a visit to super storm andy ravaged shores is on the itinera itinerary. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to wake the world up. ♪ and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. ♪ cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> u.s. equities at this hour are higher. they are mixed. continued new records. right thou, the dow futures are up by less than 4 points. s&p futures down by less than a point. we'll see
-making process. i do not care what president you want to talk about -- ronald reagan, harry truman, dwight eisenhower. moral courage is sapped by what i would call political reality. it is sapped by clinical opposition and the caliber and brouhaha nature of that opposition. what happens when you confront a series like this, even though you are in your second term, have been reelected, even though you do not have political concerns for yourself, you do have concerns for others. why do you think my party, the republican party, is still going on about benghazi? it has nothing to do with their affection for the incident or their desire to find the truth. it has everything to do with hillary clinton so she will not be a candidate or give them worry in the next presidential election. what about elections in the congress with regard to the house and the senate? they are up there, too, so the president has to concern himself with all these things. i come back to my original point very seldom in the post-world war ii national security state do we find a president with the moral courage to go agains
to sit at the negotiation table. you want to meet with her one- on-one, but the regular order, harry reid tried to get it started last night and senate republicans blocked him. when does the clock start? >> we want to go to conference, but we want to go when we have a good chance of actually getting something done. want to get a deal. i want an agreement. we do not want to go to conference just for the sake of a joint conference. we want an agreement. this is more of a house thing than a senate thing, but if we go to conference with a monthlong stalemate in conference, which ends up happening is people dig in their positions making it that much harder to get agreement. >> that is your lesson from the supercommittee? >> it is. our motivation is action to get to an agreement in the decisions we're making right now is to maximize the likelihood of getting an agreement that the end of the day. what does that mean that you guys have to political budget? what do i want my budget to become law? i do. but they get that in a divided government, you do not get everything you want. we understand tha
-- of the perils exist. she very much interacted with them. there was one named henry harris, a man who worked at the white house to allow the children. she suggested to begin with and then she was very emphatic that he stuck by washington real-estate. well, he died a wealthy man. but she -- jerry smith is another favorite of hers. the members of the staff. and she ran the whole thing. and with the help of the dormant. i think alike the remark of how the military was organized. she seemed to run things the wake. >> found the white house and the state of disrepair. and we were talking about this before the program. a bit of a different view. we both read about the fact that there were infrastructure problems and-tackle this and also did agree refurbishment of the design. >> well, lot of it was a perception that she wanted to present to the public. to this was the nation's home as well as their home. there were only a temporary resident. she also was concern in some ways that the fact that she was from the west, i should call the , the issue would not have the social acumen that many of the east
was a personal friend of harry truman. and barney frank know each other for a long time. barney makes a speech at the press club in the spring of '09 inviting small banks to participate in the process. fein picks it up. thanks him. they start back channel. ends up in frank's office. frank said i need you. cam, let's make a deal. they make a deal. fein will keep it neutral on the consumer protection agency. and frank will embrace an amendment to change the formula for fdic payments. change it in a way that saves the community banks $1.5 billion. >> so a billion and a half of money paid for the fdic shifts from small banks to big banks in return for neutrality. >> which is huge for barney. >> they stayed neutral. >> what do you think about that? is that good? is that the way we should be making law in america? >> there's a lot that's not good about the way we make laws in america. this is democracy. we make trades, compromises and pull it together. this is not new. it has been going on for years. >> he didn't tell us about that. >> look, cam did well by his people. he did what he was supposed to
and for this segment, we have a very able moderator in shane harris. go ahead and come up. sharon -- shane is a national security writer at the washington magazine, one of thee top reporters on all things national security in town. he's the author of the watchers, the rise of america's surveillance state, a very good book, and i should thank him because in addition to moderating today, he was part of the inform mall brain forming sessions on putting together the day, and so i want to thank shane for his thought leadership on this subject, and now i turn the program over to you. >> great, thanks very much. that's a great introduction to the policy challenges we face in this technology, and now what we'll do is was said, try to understand what the state of the technology is and where it's going in the relatively near future because i think it is poised to take off, informative, and disruptive, but extremely exciting, so the two people we have here with us today to help us do that are extremely capable, and i'm excited to have them together. to the right, missy cummings, professor at mit, spe
was somewhat true because the senate majority leader harry reid bought directly to the floor rather than sending it through the regular process in this session. however, as i said, senator baucus opposes the bill. montana doesn't have a sales tax. senator widen of oregon, she is strongly opposed to this. he's in the more liberal wing of the senate that he has framed this as forcing businesses to take over government responsibility. again, or again doesn't have a sales tax and he has sought exemption from those states and retailers. the problem on that, senator enzi points out certain states are not forced to comply then by all likelihood, those states will become the center of online retailing because everyone will move there were they don't have to charge a sales tax. >> host: is there an estimate of the revenue that could be raised? >> guest: 23 billion as the number thrown around. that would be sales taxes that are not being paid, as it would go to states, counties, localities, whoever collect sales tax. >> host: is their -- are there still companies that are not charging sales tax on
with them. there was one named henry harris who had a lot of thatren -- she suggested he start buying washington real estate. he died a wealthy man. she forced him to put part of his salary into that. jerry smith was another favorite of hers, of the members of the staff, and she ran the whole thing. with the help of the doorman. -- doormen. i think that is likely remark, the way the military was organized. host: she found the white house and a state of disrepair. bill, who studies the white house, has a bit of a different view, but you and i read about the fact that they were infrastructure problems and she tackled this and did great refurbishment of this. what do you know if it? guest: i think a lot of it was the perception she wanted to present to the public. , as was the nation's home well as their home. they were only temporary residence -- residents. she was concerned in some ways, the fact that she was from the west, as she called it, which missouri was at the time -- that she did not have the social acumen that many of the eastern families would've expected. she wanted to ensur
the senate majority leader harry reid brought it directly to the floor rather than sending it through the regular process this ashen. as i said, baucus opposes the bill. montana does not have a sales tax. senator wyden from oregon has also been strongly opposed. obviously from the moral liberal wing of the senate, but he framed this as businesses taking over government responsibility. oregon does not have a sales tax. he sought exemptions for those sorts of states and retailers. the problem with that, senator and see points out, that if certain they cannot forced to comply by all likelihood those states would become the center of online retailer progress -- retailing gossip -- retailing because everyone would move there. host: how much could be raised? guest: $23 billion has been going around. it would go to states, counties, localities, whoever that are not charging sales tax on internet purchases? guest: absolutely. i think it is fair to say most companies don't. the retailers and companies do, maybe not the majority but gradually an increasing number of online purchases have sales
. this is not a partisan issue. in 1985 ted kennedy, harry reid, joe biden all supported giving public sector employees the flexibility to choose comp time. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i cannot think of a better mother's day gift. this is something we can do right now to help families at a time when they need it most. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from north carolina yields back. the gentleman from connecticut is recognized. mr. courtney: thank you, mr. speaker. i now recognize the gentlewoman from new york, mrs. maloney, for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york is recognized for one minute. mrs. maloney: i thank the gentleman for his leadership in yielding. i rise in opposition to the republican party's working families flexibility act. it should be named the fake flexibility act. it's failure to advertise truthfully. if you were true, you would call it the more work and less pay act. and under this bill workers would lose the basic guarantees of fair pay for overtime work and time off from work und
harry at the arlington national spokesman tarry. here on c-span we'll be live ith the discussions on the guantanamo bay prison. that's at 10:00 a.m. eastern. 1:30, the institute for korean peninsula and national security and what happens on the orean peninsula. >> she's the first, first lady to earn a college degree. during the civil war soldiers serving under her husband called her the mother of the regime. she influenced her party to switch to the anti-slavery party. meet lucy hays wife of the 19th president as we continue our series on first ladies. monday night live at 9:00 eastern on c-span and c-span3. also, on c-span radio and c-span.org. now a hearing on the 2014 budget request for the air force. a house appropriation committee heard from chief of staff mark welsh for two hours. they answered questions about automatic spending cuts, they were asked about sexual assaults in the military and a negative report on officers who operate nuclear missiles in north dakota. topic is the he and yourar 2014 budget posture for the budget of 2014. the air force is the only ones to rece
, the servants, and all the payrolls, and she very much interacted with them. there was one named henry harris who had a lot of children. she suggested that he start buying washington real estate. he died a wealthy man. she forced him to put part of his salary into that. jerry smith was another favorite of hers, of the members of the staff. she ran the whole thing with the help of the doormen. i think that is a likely remark, the way the military was organized. host: she found the white house in a state of disrepair. bill, who studies the white house, has a bit of a different view, but you and i read about the fact that there were infrastructure problems, and she tackled this and did great refurbishments of this. what do you know if it? ofat do you know if it?-- it? guest: i think a lot of it was the perception she wanted to present to the public. this was the nation's home, as well as their home. they were only temporary residents. she was concerned in some ways, the fact that she was from the west, as she called it, which missouri was at the time -- that she did not have the social acumen th
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)